Preserving the real places and the real stories of Texas.
  • Preservation intern Cynthia BrzostowskiPreservation intern Cynthia Brzostowski
  • Norris White, preservation fellow, in the fieldNorris White, preservation fellow, in the field
  • Diversity interns gain hands on experienceDiversity interns gain hands on experience
  • Sehila Casper in the field at the Zion Cemetery in Hilton Head Island, SCSehila Casper in the field at the Zion Cemetery in Hilton Head Island, SC
  • 2013 THC Diversity Interns, Sehila Casper and Joel Zapata2013 THC Diversity Interns, Sehila Casper and Joel Zapata

The Preservartion Scholars Program

The THC Preservation Scholars Program

The Friends of the Texas Historical Commission (Friends) and the Texas Historical Commission (THC) seek to increase the diversity of professionals working in historic preservation, acknowledge the variety of cultures that enrich Texas' heritage, and engage a wider range of organizations and communities in supporting efforts to protect and preserve the history of our state.

The Preservation Scholars Program (previously know as the THC Diversity Internship) was created to build interest in and awareness of historic preservation, specifically among students from underrepresented cultural, ethnic, and socioeconomic groups. This initiative targets undergraduate students, through a summer internship program, to encourage their interest in pursuing fields of study in history, preservation, architecture, landscape architecture, archeology, downtown revitalization and heritage tourism.

Click here to learn more about the THC Preservation Scholars Program

The Matthew Honer and Larutha Odom Clay Preservation Scholars Endowment 

The Matthew Honer and Larutha Odom Clay Diversity Internship Endowment will provide a stipend to a Prairie View A&M University (PVAMU) student who will participate in the THC summer internship program. The fund was created in 2015 in memory of Larutha M. Odom Clay.

Matthew Clay and Larutha Odom met as undergraduate students at PVAMU, and were active members of the campus community.  She excelled as a leader of the Speech and Debate team, while he shined as a World-class track and field and football star.

The Clays married in 1950 and moved to the Beaumont/Port Arthur area where they served as educators for more than 70 years combined.  Mrs. Clay taught English, speech, debate, drama and journalism at Lincoln High School in Port Arthur, TX, and at Hebert, Forest Park and Westbrook High Schools in Beaumont. Beyond the classroom, she helped the children of former students improve their writing skills, and conducted symposia, seminars, workshops and demonstrations via church and civic organizations to improve speaking and writing skills. Mrs. Clay also was known throughout the area and the state as a dynamic motivational and spiritual speaker.

Mr. Clay taught Mathematics and Industrial Arts and coached football, and track at Lincoln Jr. High and French High schools in Beaumont.  He was also a sought-after draftsman and general contractor, designing and building/remodeling numerous homes, civic and religious structures throughout the Golden Triangle.

As advocates of civic and spiritual engagement, Mr. and Mrs. Clay were Life Members of the NAACP, and long-time Sunday School Teachers at their home church. Mr. Clay was inducted into the Prairie View A&M University Sports Hall of Fame in 2007. Mrs. Clay was the first black woman to be inducted into the Daughters of the Republic of Texas in 2004. As a founding member and secretary/treasurer of the Shankleville Historical Society, Inc., Mrs. Clay helped drive the Society’s 20-plus-years scholarship program for college-bound students, document the history of the Shankleville Community and the genealogy of its founding families, and organize the first Texas Purple Hull Pea Festival in 2014.

Both Mr. and Mrs. Clay also received their Masters degrees from Prairie View A&M University.

Please  to make a gift to the Matthew Honer and Larutha Odom Clay Preservation Scholars Endowment.