Preserving the real places and the real stories of Texas.
  • Help preserve Texas history by supporting Friends of the Texas Historical CommissionHelp preserve Texas history by supporting Friends of the Texas Historical Commission

    25th Anniversary Celebration Events

    The Friends of the Texas Historical Commission is celebrating it's 25th anniversary in 2021! We will be holding events throughout the year to celebrate--both virtual, and in-person later in the year at the Texas Historical Commission's state historic sites. We hope you are able to join in helping us celebrate 25 years of serving as a critical nonprofit partner to the Texas Historical Commission! 

     

    UPCOMING EVENTS

     

    Thursday, September 23, 6:00 p.m. CDT: Marine Archeology in Texas
    Platform: Zoom 
    (Registrants will receive the link to the event via email closer to event date)
    Cost: Free
    Texas boasts a rich, vast maritime history spanning nearly 500 years, commencing with the accidental stranding of Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca and survivors of the Pánfilo de Narváez’ Expedition at Galveston in 1528. Unfortunately, maritime travel was often perilous, resulting in the loss of thousands of vessels off the Texas coast. Nearly 2,000 shipwrecks are reported, with only 180 archeological sites discovered so far. Texas contains the oldest shipwrecks in the United States, the 1554 Spanish Plate Fleet, and those dating from the colonial period to World War II. Join us and learn more about Texas’ exciting shipwreck archeology and its still undiscovered mysteries.

    Image: Rindlisbacher, Peter. 2021. Texas Historical Commission.

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    PECAN PRALINES - IMAGE COURTESY OF FLICKR / CHRISTINA B. CASTRO

    Saturday, October 2, 2:00 p.m. CDT: You Say Prah-LEENS, We Say PRAY-leens: The Texas Praline Tradition
    Platform: Zoom (Registrants will receive the link to the event via email closer to event date)
    Cost: Free

    Pecan pralines are a beloved element of the Creole cuisine of New Orleans, and their culinary ancestors traveled a long journey from medieval Persia through Europe to French Louisiana in the New World. 

    Equally beloved—but less well-known outside of Texas—are the pecan pralines found in Texas-Mexican cooking traditions. Originally sold by 19th-century Tejano street vendors, they later became the standard dessert in 20th-century Tex-Mex restaurants across the state.

    What food-culture migrations brought these caramelized sugar and nut confections to Texas, and do they share common roots with the pralines of Louisiana? Why are these Texas candies called by the French term "pralines?"

    In this presentation, author and food historian MM Pack will explore the origins and paths of Texas pralines and the connections to their culinary cousins in Louisiana and Mexico. 

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    Images: Pecan Pralines courtesy of FLICKR / Christina B. Castro; Mexican Candy Man, San Antonio, Texas 1902-04.