Preserving the real places and the real stories of Texas.

AIA/TxA Credits

Members of the American Institute of Architects (AIA) can earn continuing education credits to meet goals and licensing requirements by attending the Real Places workshops and sessions below. Texas Society of Architects (TxA) is the provider of record. AIA Learning Units (LU) and health, safety, and welfare (HSW) credits are listed for each AIA-approved course. More information about AIA’s continuing education program can be found at aia.org/continuing-education and texasarchitects.org/continuing-education.


Wednesday, January 16

Thursday, January 17

Friday, January 18

 


Soaring over Schulenburg: The Painted Churches of Central Texas

Course Description: For centuries, Texas has been what cultural geographer Terry Jordan called a “confluence of cultures.” These influences can be found in place names, language, architecture, and material culture. Many predominantly Czech and German communities transplanted versions of their former hometowns to the new world, most notably in what are known today as the Painted Churches. In 1983, 15 Painted Churches statewide were listed in the National Register of Historic Places. This rare art form is manifested in some of the state’s highest expressions of design, architecture, and worship through such methods as freehand work, stenciling, infill, graining, and marbling. Participants will experience a guided tour of four of the churches centered on Schulenburg, in the communities of Dubina, High Hill, Praha, and Ammannsville. Along the way, THC staff will speak on the importance of cultural landscapes, and at the churches, local experts will illustrate the history and artwork of these uplifting Texas treasures. Special guest Robert Marshall is an award-winning conservator who will share details of the restoration work he performed at two of the churches: Saints Cyril and Methodius Church in Dubina and Saint Mary Church in High Hill.

Learning Units and Credit Designation: 7 LU|HSW

AIA Course Number: THC18109

Course Format: Instructor-led, face-to-face

Learning Objective 1: Participants will be able to analyze cultural landscapes and identify their significant character-defining features, according to National Register Criteria.

Learning Objective 2: Participants will learn from a conservator about restoration work considerations for historic interior finishes and materials, in an effort to sustain the original features.

Learning Objective 3: Participants will be able to identify historic artistic methods including freehand work, stenciling, infill, graining and marbling.

Learning Objective 4: Participants will learn historic building methods and interior decoration styles of historic churches.

AIA CES Approved Provider of Record: Texas Society of Architects

Provider Point of Contact: communications@texasarchitects.org.

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Hands-on Masonry Restoration Workshop

Course Description: Learn by doing in this full-day workshop with opportunities to use cleaning materials and tools to address staining and deterioration conditions frequently encountered on historic masonry structures, including urban grime, mold and mildew stains, and paint and graffiti removal. Additionally, there will be demonstrations in the use of various materials and techniques for masonry repair and repointing.

The workshop will begin with a classroom component to introduce the features and format of the workshop. Then, it will move outdoors on the grounds of the Texas Historical Commission’s French Legation State Historic Site, and will include a short “hard hat” tour of the site, which is currently closed to the public during ongoing preservation work. Come prepared with weather-wise clothing and shoes suitable for a muddy jobsite.

Learning Units and Credit Designation: 5 LU|HSW

AIA Course Number: THC19108

Course Format: Instructor-led, face-to-face

Learning Objective 1: By participating in this THC Workshop attendees will understand the best methods and materials for removing urban grime, mold and mildew stains, paint and graffiti.

Learning Objective 2: Learn by doing, using cleaning agents and tools to remediate masonry staining and deterioration under the supervision of qualified experts.

Learning Objective 3: Learn about the various types of masonry deterioration and the sources of deterioration.

Learning Objective 4: Discuss masonry repair and repointing techniques.

AIA CES Approved Provider of Record: Texas Society of Architects

Provider Point of Contact: communications@texasarchitects.org.

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Historic Preservation Officer Basics (Part of the Certified Local Government Workshop)

Course Description: This workshop will focus on preservation basics for new or seasoned Historic Preservation Officers (HPOs) working in a city Certified Local Government (CLG). Each HPO is encouraged to bring a copy of his or her community’s preservation ordinance for more tailored instruction. CLG Program staff will review the typical process for the local designation of historic landmarks and districts, and explain how maintaining an updated historic resources survey is integral to the process. The training will also cover the HPO’s role in the design review process, and participants will gain experience drafting staff reports for preservation commission meetings.

Learning Units and Credit Designation: 2 LU|HSW

AIA Course Number: THC19102

Course Format: Instructor-led, face-to-face

Learning Objective 1: Attendees will learn about the Certified Local Government (CLG) Program-how it is a resource for Historic Preservation Officers (HPO)and how it will empower their community to develop high standards of preservation to protect the wide range of important historic assets that gives each community a unique sense of place.

Learning Objective 2: Attendees will learn about the requirements of participating in the CLG Program through a review of the revised CLG Handbook, whose guidance includes what process is followed by the CLG to review/approve/deny requests for any new construction or demolition of buildings within a historic district.

Learning Objective 3: Attendees will learn how the preservation ordinance is the framework of the local preservation program and will analyze the parts of his or her own ordinance during the workshop.

Learning Objective 4: Attendees will learn about the HPO’s role in local designation and design review; including, assistance with the application for designation, presentations to the preservation commission, Planning and Zoning commission, and City Council, and staff reports for design review.

AIA CES Approved Provider of Record: Texas Society of Architects

Provider Point of Contact: communications@texasarchitects.org.

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Certified Local Government Workshop

Course Description: Participants will enjoy a working lunch of brainstorming, sharing ideas, and networking with other Certified Local Governments (CLGs). After lunch, Megan Brown of the National Park Service (NPS) will explain her role in working with the nearly 2,000 CLGs across the nation. Attendees will be energized from learning about the NPS’ vision for the future of the CLG Program and how Texas CLGs fit into its goals.

Later, Historic Preservation Officers from three Texas CLGs will discuss their recent work in community engagement, winning the support of local leaders, and changing their cities’ historic preservation ordinance to better protect historic resources.

Learning Units and Credit Designation: 4 LU|HSW

AIA Course Number: THC19103

Course Format: Instructor-led, face-to-face

Learning Objective 1: Attendees will learn about the history and future of the CLG Program at the federal level.

Learning Objective 2: Attendees will learn about engaging the public in local preservation efforts to build support and a stronger preservation ethic.

Learning Objective 3: Attendees will learn about one community’s process, challenges, and successes in revising the local preservation ordinance.

Learning Objective 4: Attendees will learn about the political challenges of running a local preservation program.

AIA CES Approved Provider of Record: Texas Society of Architects

Provider Point of Contact: communications@texasarchitects.org.

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Historic Tax Credits How-To: Everything You Need to Know About Utilizing Historic Preservation Tax Credits

Course Description: This workshop will provide an in-depth look at the Federal Rehabilitation Tax Credit and the Texas Historic Preservation Tax Credit programs administered by the Texas Historical Commission (THC). Program staff will give a thorough introduction, covering eligibility and how tax credits work with the National Register of Historic Places; the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation and how the THC reviews architectural work; and how to prepare and submit effective tax credit applications. Additionally, a panel of tax credit users will answer questions about selling tax credits, attracting investors, coordinating with local review processes, finding historic buildings, utilizing professional services, and other related issues.

Learning Units and Credit Designation: 4 LU|HSW

AIA Course Number: THC19104

Course Format: Instructor-led, face-to-face

Learning Objective 1: Participants will have a basic understanding of the federal and state historic rehabilitation tax credit programs and how qualified rehabilitations have made tangible impacts on small communities through re-use of previously vacant buildings.

Learning Objective 2: Participants will learn how tax credit review process has been successfully managed to produce successful rehabilitation projects that both fit the owner’s goals and meet preservation historic features of the building.

Learning Objective 3: Participants will have an understanding of the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation and how those are applied to basic architectural issues.

Learning Objective 4: Participants will understand how Texas Historical Commission staff work with architects and preservation professionals to develop plans and execute rehabilitation work which building owners have successfully implemented and has become a model for other tax credit programs across the country.

AIA CES Approved Provider of Record: Texas Society of Architects

Provider Point of Contact: communications@texasarchitects.org.

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Breakout 1A: Computer in a Roll-Top Desk—Integrating Technology into Historic Buildings

Course Description: The walls are 28 inches think, there are no dropped ceilings, the basement is damp and dusty (with rodents), there are miles of abandoned wires all over the place, and there’s no reliable A/C dedicated to a server. These are a few of the challenges faced when converting historic buildings into fully functioning 21st-century places of business complete with essential technologies.

Explore solutions for consolidating systems and trades. Learn to avoid common mistakes that occur when technology upgrades are not considered holistically. Discuss all aspects of workday needs for communication, document creation, record storage and retention, lighting and air-conditioning controls, energy management, audio-visual systems, and security.

Learning Units and Credit Designation: 1 LU|HSW

AIA Course Number: THC19111

Course Format: Instructor-led, face-to-face

Learning Objective 1: By participating in this THC Stewardship Session, attendees will identify physical obstacles commonly encountered in historic courthouses, when technology systems are installed or expanded to meet changing needs for the daily operation of the courts and county government.

Learning Objective 2: By participating in this THC Stewardship Session, attendees will investigate ways to reduce the cost-impact of new or expanded systems, and how to minimize the physical impact of new technology in your historic courthouse.

Learning Objective 3: By participating in this THC Stewardship Session, attendees will evaluate strategies for planning, budgeting, and implementing new systems in your old courthouse.

Learning Objective 4: By participating in this THC Stewardship Session, attendees will apply the Secretary of the Interior's STANDARDS to the installation of technology in historic buildings through the presentation of case studies from recent projects.

AIA CES Approved Provider of Record: Texas Society of Architects

Provider Point of Contact: communications@texasarchitects.org.

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Breakout 1E: Come Home to Downtown

Course Description: Every downtown wants more residential housing, but the codes are complex, buildings are old, and historic rehabilitation is not for everyone. Regulatory constraints, financing, and community perceptions all play a role in making residential redevelopment more challenging than other uses. However, there are developers who are willing to tackle these challenges for projects that make a difference in their communities. This session provides insight from several small-scale developers working on successful residential rehabilitations in Texas downtowns using both the state and federal historic tax credit programs.

The panelists will share their perspectives as developers—what motivated them to undertake their respective projects, the regulatory issues they encountered, how communities can support their efforts, and advice they have for others who want to take on their first downtown redevelopment project. Attendees will learn how to attract and support small-scale developers in their downtowns, as well as gain insight on navigating financing and code constraints in order to make residential rehabilitation projects happen.

Learning Units and Credit Designation: 1 LU|HSW

AIA Course Number: THC19115

Course Format: Instructor-led, face-to-face

Learning Objective 1: Case Studies—Attendees will learn about two successful examples of smaller scale residential rehabilitations (about 10 units each) in downtowns that are not major metro areas.  This scale of project is more rare but desirable for cities working on downtown revitalization.

Learning Objective 2: Finance—Attendees will learn from examples of how to structure financial deals for residential historic rehabilitation projects including use of historic tax credit programs.

Learning Objective 3: Code Challenges—Attendees will learn about code and other regulatory challenges that are common in historic residential rehabilitation projects and how to resolve those challenges.

Learning Objective 4: Public-private partnerships—Attendees will learn what existing conditions and programs need to be in place on the part of the local government in order to attract developers to their downtown interested in doing historic residential rehabilitation.

AIA CES Approved Provider of Record: Texas Society of Architects

Provider Point of Contact: communications@texasarchitects.org.

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Breakout 2A: Plaster Restoration in your Historic Building

Course Description: Before there was drywall, there was plaster, and historic Texas buildings are full of it. And while three-coat plaster is unmatched in strength and durability, resists fire, and reduces sound transmission, when damaged, repairs appear daunting and expensive. But restoration is possible and is often the preferable solution. Benefit from Burt Wagner’s decades of experience as he and Texas Historical Commission architects present on several plaster restoration and repair projects in historic buildings. The cases presented will illustrate the sequence of restoration from a damaged state, through selective demolition, and to application of multiple layers to achieve the finished product.

Learning Units and Credit Designation: 1 LU|HSW

AIA Course Number: THC19116

Course Format: Instructor-led, face-to-face

Learning Objective 1: By participating in this THC Stewardship Session, attendees will observe the correct sequence of plaster restoration, through presentation of several current case studies.

Learning Objective 2: By participating in this THC Stewardship Session, attendees will identify different types of plaster, their use, opportunities and limitations.

Learning Objective 3: By participating in this THC Stewardship Session, attendees will evaluate the cost-benefit of plaster repair versus replacement with new plaster or drywall.

Learning Objective 4: By participating in this THC Stewardship Session, attendees will understand the components of a plaster wall system, plaster mixes, and types of lath.

AIA CES Approved Provider of Record: Texas Society of Architects

Provider Point of Contact: communications@texasarchitects.org.

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Breakout 2D: Open the Door—Interpreting Historic Churches and Sacred Spaces

Course Description: Not every Texas community has a historic courthouse, Civil War battlefield, or history museum. Virtually all, however, have a historic church with a rich past that yearns to be told, as well as parishioners eager to get involved. Eubanks will share experiences not only with churches and sacred spaces around the world, but also with interpreting a specific church: St. Mary Cathedral in Austin. One of the oldest churches in the city, it was a key player in the restoration of the Catholic church to Texas after the revolution. Delve into the world of historic churches and learn about ways you can engage the public in these often-overlooked historic resources.

Learning Units and Credit Designation: 1 LU

AIA Course Number: THC19125

Course Format: Instructor-led, face-to-face

Learning Objective 1: Attendees will learn how to research and interpret an often overlooked, but common historic resource: churches and sacred spaces.  

Learning Objective 2: Attendees will learn methods to engage community churches and leaders to promote inclusive-planning practices in heritage-focused planning and tourism efforts.

Learning Objective 3: Attendees will learn the basic historic role city planning played in the locations and of civic spaces and churches in Austin and in Texas, and about the impact the Emancipation Proclamation had on the formation of new freedman congregations.

Learning Objective 4: Attendees will become familiar with examples of church interpretation as seen in state, national, and international case studies. Specifically, attendees will learn about a recent project to interpret Austin’s historic St. Mary Cathedral. Participants will learn of the social and architectural relationship of the cathedral with contemporaneous sites in Austin and elsewhere, as well as St. Mary's role in the restoration of the Catholic Church to Texas after the Texas Revolution.

AIA CES Approved Provider of Record: Texas Society of Architects

Provider Point of Contact: communications@texasarchitects.org.

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Breakout 2E: Making Places Real and Measuring Success in Public Projects

Course Description: Places become “real” when visitors touch and feel the importance of where they are. How do we tell our stories in ways that visitors can feel and touch? How do we know if what we create is truly engaging? In this session, we’ll journey through the processes that change public spaces into memorable interpretive experiences and transformative tourism drivers. We’ll discuss measuring success using analytic tools built in at the start of a project. We’ll share Signature Design’s metric of objectives that define design criteria, which are tracked to measure a project’s success.

Learning Units and Credit Designation: 1 LU|HSW

AIA Course Number: THC19126

Course Format: Instructor-led, face-to-face

Learning Objective 1: Attendees will learn how local history informs the process of designing engaging community spaces.  

Learning Objective 2: Attendees will become familiar with unique approaches to interpretive design through project case studies that discuss project vision, local needs and desires, stakeholders and collaborator participation, and environmental aesthetics.

Learning Objective 3: Attendees will learn how a project's objectives are tracked used as an evalutative tool to measure its success.

Learning Objective 4: Attendees will learn how the tools of creative problem solving can change public speces into memorable interpretive experiences and transformative tourism drivers.

AIA CES Approved Provider of Record: Texas Society of Architects

Provider Point of Contact: communications@texasarchitects.org.

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Breakout 3A: Maintaining Magnificence—Help in the Form of a Courthouse Maintenance Handbook

Course Description: Receive a guided overview of the newly published Texas Historic Courthouse Maintenance Handbook from the people who wrote it. Prepared by McCoy Collaborative Preservation Architecture, the new handbook was developed in close consultation with the Texas Historical Commission’s Texas Historic Courthouse Preservation Program, as well as consultations with Courthouse Stewards and interviews with staff of several Texas counties. While the new handbook is intended to assist in establishing a proactive annual maintenance schedule and addressing specific challenges to all types of courthouses, it also easily applies to the stewardship of many other types of historic buildings. It is full of illustrations and step-by-step instructions to help prevent major building problems.

Learning Units and Credit Designation: 1 LU|HSW

AIA Course Number: THC19123

Course Format: Instructor-led, face-to-face

Learning Objective 1: By participating in this THC Stewardship Session, attendees will learn about why and how building maintenance can save an owner money, time, predict on-going costs and other benefits.

Learning Objective 2: By participating in this THC Stewardship Session, attendees will gain ability to identify common maintenance needs and how to address them in the historic courthouse building type.

Learning Objective 3: By participating in this THC Stewardship Session, attendees will learn how to conduct a visual assessment of essential features and systems in historic courthouses.

Learning Objective 4: By participating in this THC Stewardship Session, attendees will apply the information presented to create a plan of scheduled tasks to control and anticipate building maintenance and repairs, and to assist clients with this post-construction activity.

AIA CES Approved Provider of Record: Texas Society of Architects

Provider Point of Contact: communications@texasarchitects.org.

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Breakout 3B: Spirit of Place—Connecting Cultural Mapping to Design Guidelines

Course Description: Preservation is all about managing change, but what are the best tools and practices for managing cultural heritage with rapid urban development? Often, cultural properties aren’t recognized for their architecture, but rather for the culture—the spirit of place—of the communities they reflect. Traditional design guidelines aren’t always sufficient, and these cases can be difficult for city staff, review commissions, and the communities affected. Presenters will discuss how community engagement through cultural mapping and storytelling, combined with an analysis of archival documents and traditional survey methods, have produced updated guidelines for use in the design review process.

Learning Units and Credit Designation: 1 LU|HSW

AIA Course Number: THC19124

Course Format: Instructor-led, face-to-face

Learning Objective 1: Attendees will learn how cultural mapping and story-telling can inform the design review process.  

Learning Objective 2: Attendees will learn how understanding cultural traditions, equity in preservation, and treatment and protection of culturally significant properties and communities are vital to redevelopment in communities undergoing economic transition.

Learning Objective 3: Attendees will learn how to engage community residents in planning practices in heritage-focused redevelopment efforts and how the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals and the New Urban Agenda may be furthered through these efforts.

Learning Objective 4: Attendees will explore ways to include broader data to develop more relevant design guidelines.

AIA CES Approved Provider of Record: Texas Society of Architects

Provider Point of Contact: communications@texasarchitects.org.

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Breakout 3C: Creative Placemaking + Arts / Culture Planning

Course Description: Communities across the U.S. are drawing on their arts and culture to guide community development and celebrate local history. Creative Placemaking (CP) brings together diverse partners and practitioners to shape the social and physical character of our communities around arts and culture. CP is a unique opportunity for artists, elected officials, historic preservationists, neighborhood residents, local business owners, design professionals, and educators to collaborate for the benefit of our communities. Lynn Osgood, urban planner and researcher, will provide an overview of CP practice and national case studies highlighting a diversity of communities, artistic genres, and collaborators. She will also present her current work with Bastrop and the process of creating its arts + culture master plan. Drawing from her past research for the National Endowment for the Arts, Osgood will share the opportunities she sees for CP and celebrating arts and culture in communities across the state.

Learning Units and Credit Designation: 1 LU|HSW

AIA Course Number: THC19120

Course Format: Instructor-led, face-to-face

Learning Objective 1: Attendees will learn the basics of the Creative Placemaking practice and become familiar with the diversity of communities, artistic genres, and collaborators.

Learning Objective 2: Attendees will become familiar with three national case studies and their project stories, including context, local needs, project vision, partnerships, logistics/funding, collaborators, evaluation metrics, and measured impacts.

Learning Objective 3: Attendees will gather resources for future projects and become familiar with leading non-profit organizations/governmental agencies and their funding opportunities.

Learning Objective 4: Attendees will identify new opportunities in their own communities to celebrate local history and foster appreciation for the historic fabric/architecture within Creative Placemaking work.

AIA CES Approved Provider of Record: Texas Society of Architects

Provider Point of Contact: communications@texasarchitects.org.

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Breakout 4A: Let’s Keep It Dry—Basement Leak-Prevention and Waterproofing

Course Description: There are basements in Texas! It’s true that they are more common in other parts of the U.S., but architects from “back East” designed many courthouses and other significant buildings with basements. Unfortunately, the skills, knowledge, and maintenance required for keeping them dry is a lost art. Gain insight into the right ways, wrong ways, and stop-gaps to protect your basement without tearing everything apart. Bring your favorite basement horror story to share during this learning session.

Learning Units and Credit Designation: 1 LU|HSW

AIA Course Number: THC19127

Course Format: Instructor-led, face-to-face

Learning Objective 1: By participating in this THC Stewardship Session attendees, will identify different causes of basement leaks. 

Learning Objective 2: By participating in this THC Stewardship Session attendees, will investigate types of damage and the consequences of neglect.

Learning Objective 3: By participating in this THC Stewardship Session attendees, will evaluate short- and long-term options for leak prevention and basement waterproofing.

Learning Objective 4: By participating in this THC Stewardship Session attendees, will apply the most cost-effective solution for their courthouse or other historic building.

AIA CES Approved Provider of Record: Texas Society of Architects

Provider Point of Contact: communications@texasarchitects.org.

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Breakout 4E: Houston, We Have a Problem—Restoring the Apollo Mission Control Center

Course Description: How do you restore one of the world’s most iconic landmarks when it’s a lower priority for management due to dwindling budgets and existing turf wars? Although it landed the first man on the moon, the Apollo Mission Control Center is a threatened National Historic Landmark. As the pressure to reduce the federal footprint mounts and NASA’s budget is reduced, the protection and restoration of the Apollo Mission Control Center is an ongoing battle. This session will show the conflicts between the restoration of an iconic landmark and the push to create an exciting visitor experience for a younger audience and VIPs. It will also show how the creation of an expert team with a strong, vocal advocate can push an important restoration forward.

Learning Units and Credit Designation: 1 LU|HSW

AIA Course Number: THC19131

Course Format: Instructor-led, face-to-face

Learning Objective 1: Attendees will become familiar with historic landmarks associated with Apollo Mission Control Center. 

Learning Objective 2: Attendees will learn the strategies employed to preserve the threatened Apollo landmarks.

Learning Objective 3: Attendees will learn advocacy methods for historic preservation.

Learning Objective 4: Attendees will understand the physical restoration methods used at Apollo Mission Control Center.

AIA CES Approved Provider of Record: Texas Society of Architects

Provider Point of Contact: communications@texasarchitects.org.

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Breakfast and General Session: Dowling Street to Emancipation Avenue—Community Revitalization in Houston’s Third Ward

Course Description: Formerly called Dowling Street, Emancipation Avenue in Houston’s Third Ward is being reclaimed. This session will provide a historical context for this from an African American perspective focused on commerce and its relationship to culture. In black urban America, the patterns of built form, public spaces, and community are shrinking as a result of economic forces that began with slavery in the 16th century and continued through to Jim Crow laws in the 20th century and gentrification today. This session will examine current economic dynamics impacting Emancipation Avenue and surrounding neighborhoods. Strategies for preserving the community’s history and culture will be presented, including land “value capture,” placemaking, affordable housing, and community marketing, as well as innovative applications of form-based building codes and development regulatory reform, rooted in shared community visions and value propositions.

Learning Units and Credit Designation: 1 LU|HSW

AIA Course Number: THC19133

Course Format: Instructor-led, face-to-face

Learning Objective 1: Attendees will become familiar with Houston’s Emancipation Avenue District case study and its historical context from an African American perspective focused on commerce and its relationship to culture. In black urban America, the patterns of built form, public spaces, and community are shrinking as a result of economic forces that began with slavery in the 16th century and continued through to Jim Crow laws in the 20th century and gentrification today.

Learning Objective 2: Attendees will learn strategies for preserving a community’s history and culture, including land “value capture,” placemaking, and community marketing, all rooted in shared community visions and value propositions.

Learning Objective 3: Attendees will learn basic technical and as well as innovative applications of form-based building codes, and development regulatory reform, and development of affordable housing needs to revitalize the neighborhood.

Learning Objective 4: Attendees will learn the approaches and roles played by numerous community groups, church congregations in working with city planning and transportation offices.

AIA CES Approved Provider of Record: Texas Society of Architects

Provider Point of Contact: communications@texasarchitects.org.

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Texas Historic Courthouse Preservation Program Stewards Roundtable Discussion

Course Description: The always-popular Texas Courthouse Stewardship Roundtable Discussion is a candid dialogue about the challenges of keeping courthouses in a good state of preservation, the primary goal of the Texas Historical Commission’s (THC) Texas Historic Courthouse Stewardship Program. The format is a THC staff-led question and answer session in which participants share their ideas and experiences in small groups and then report takeaways to other attendees. While the content is applicable to many historic buildings, participants in this session usually include elected county officials, courthouse facilities managers, and THC courthouse program staff architects. It follows the previous days' workshops and technical sessions on particular aspects of historic building preservation and maintenance.

Learning Units and Credit Designation: 1.5 LU|HSW

AIA Course Number: THC19134

Course Format: Instructor-led, face-to-face

Learning Objective 1: Attendees will understand the professional assistance provided by the THC's Texas Historic Courthouse Preservation Program.

Learning Objective 2: Attendees will learn from case studies presented by experienced courthouse stewards.

Learning Objective 3: Attendees will learn strategies to advocate for support of building maintenance and preservation with the public and county officials.

Learning Objective 4: Attendees will become familiar with resources and contacts for technical maintenance of historic buildings.

AIA CES Approved Provider of Record: Texas Society of Architects

Provider Point of Contact: communications@texasarchitects.org.

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Breakout 5A: Preservation in Gentrifying Communities

Course Description: Established ethnic communities in Houston, San Antonio, Waco, and cities across the country are facing displacement as development pressures from successful economic revitalization efforts take effect. As important as physical preservation is, the cultural heritage of these neighborhoods should also be preserved and cultivated as part of a holistic approach to evolving into a sustainable neighborhood for both existing and new residents. Participants will learn how tools such as land trusts, developer sensitivity training, and cultural conservancy can help ensure the benefits of economic revitalization strengthen an existing community instead of merely supplanting it with a new one.

Learning Units and Credit Designation: 1 LU|HSW

AIA Course Number: THC19135

Course Format: Instructor-led, face-to-face

Learning Objective 1: Attendees will learn why understanding cultural traditions, equity in preservation, and the treatment and protection of culturally significant properties is vital to redevelopment in communities undergoing economic transition.

Learning Objective 2: Attendees will learn how to engage community residents in planning practices as part of a holistic redevelopment approach that includes heritage-focused efforts ensuring equity in preservation, treatment, and protection of culturally significant properties in line with the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals and the New Urban Agenda.

Learning Objective 3: Attendees will become familiar with three diverse Texas case studies in Houston, San Antonio, and Waco and their project stories, including context, local challenges, partnerships and stakeholder collaborations toward successful economic revitalization and sustainability.

Learning Objective 4: Participants will learn how tools such as land trusts, developer sensitivity training, and cultural conservancy can help ensure the benefits of economic revitalization strengthen an existing community instead of merely supplanting it with a new one.

AIA CES Approved Provider of Record: Texas Society of Architects

Provider Point of Contact: communications@texasarchitects.org.

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Lunch and General Session: A Passion for Craft

Course Description: In this informative and inspiring closing session, nationally recognized craftsman, preservationist, author, and television personality Brent Hull will share his passion for craftsmanship, how to recognize it, and why it matters. On a mission to save America’s architectural history one project at a time, Hull sees craftsmanship in building as an art that is almost lost. In this session, he will explain how we can and must relearn it.

Learning Units and Credit Designation: 1 LU|HSW

AIA Course Number: THC19138

Course Format: Instructor-led, face-to-face

Learning Objective 1: Attendees will learn the basics of identifying types of architectural craftsmanship found in historic American architecture and why these unique examples add character to the built environment.

Learning Objective 2: Attendees will become familiar with examples of restoration techniques and processes resulting in high standards of historic preservation.

Learning Objective 3: Attendees will learn why preserving the architectural integrity of buildings and homes leads to positive aesthetic and economic impacts for districts and neighborhoods.

Learning Objective 4: Attendees will learn about resources for materials, craftsman and professional experts that are needed to undertake future preservation projects in their own communities.

AIA CES Approved Provider of Record: Texas Society of Architects

Provider Point of Contact: communications@texasarchitects.org.

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